3 Very interesting and innovative examples of print this week

3 Very interesting and innovative examples of print this week
14th November 2012

I came across three very interesting and innovative examples of print this week that really caught my attention.

The first was a dot-to-dot poster that highlights US president Barack Obama’s list of accomplishments and future goals. The poster, which was created by Michael Yang, Chris Plehal, Kash Sree, and Sasithon Pooviriyakul, and pasted in neighbourhoods ahead of the US presidential election by Obama supporters, invited users to cross off one of 500 items by joining the dots to reveal an illustration of the president – the rest of the dots could only be joined up if Obama won a second term and had time to deliver on all of his election pledges (the theme of the poster was that the president had unfinished business).

dot to dot poster of Barack Obama for the 2012 election

The dot-to-dot poster that highlights US president Barack Obama, which was created by Michael Yang, Chris Plehal, Kash Sree, and Sasithon Pooviriyakul.

I’ve also loved dot-to-dot for its sheer simplicity and its ability to engage people, so I’m amazed that it is a tool that marketers don’t use more often. 

shortlistcover

Another clever print-related piece that I expect to see much more of in 2013 was ShortList magazine’s use of an augmented reality platform to create the world’s first ‘playable’ magazine cover. To mark the magazine’s gaming issue, which featured a list of the top 20 retro games ever, ShortList partnered with augmented reality software provider Blippar to allow users to play the classic 1980s Chuckie Egg video game on the magazine’s cover on a smartphone or tablet device. Additional interactive content was also placed throughout the magazine, including a scannable 2013 new games preview that readers could scan for exclusive trailers of the biggest games releases over the next 12 months.

Finally, rarely a week goes by without yet another example of an interesting 3D print concept and this week was no different thanks to Belgium design studio Unfold.

Kiosk - Unfold

It hit upon the idea of creating a 3D printing kiosk, attached to a foot-pedalled tricycle that allows 3D objects to be scanned and printed out wherever the kiosk goes. Equipped with a Bits From Bytes printer and Polhemus 3D scanner, the Kiosk can create custom 3D prints on the spot of allows users to choose from a number of pre-printed objects on display to show the capabilities of the system.